It's that time of year for seasonal illnesses.

Currently, it is cold and flu season and people just get sick being in public whether they like it or not. It was also reported that a new COVID variant is rearing it's ugly head. It seems as though people are taking it in stride this season and getting over thing fairly quickly.

However, new reports came out yesterday (Oct. 30th) on where COVID hospitalizations are occurring and how much hospitals are taking a hit. It's all from the COVID tracker from the CDC on new hospital admissions rate per 100,000 population in the past week by county in the US.

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#maps_new-admissions-rate-state
https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#maps_new-admissions-rate-state
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At this point, there's nothing to be alarmed about when it comes to infection or hospital occupancy. However, we do have a handful of counties within our state that have had a boost of COVID cases reported within the last week.

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The highest counts are from four counties according to The CDC of hospitalizations per 100,000 people:

- Park County: 24.6

-Sweetgrass County: 24.6

-Beaverhead County: 22.4

Deerlodge County: 22.4

In each of these counties its about a 70% percent increase from the previous readings. Cascade County reported 13.4 per 100,000 with a 14% increase.

The national average is still way down showing that we still have the novel virus under control as a country.

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#datatracker-home
https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#datatracker-home
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Just remember, to stay vigilant during the season by washing your hands, get plenty of fluids, exercise, as well as plenty of sleep. Having all of those tools in your pocket can help with not catching anything and being both happier and healthier through winter.

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